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What we are monitoring in South Carolina:

Bill: 2015 H.B. 3706, introduced by Representative Joshua Putnam (R) on Physician Dispensing. Status: Final Enacted  Current version (3/8/2016): Authorizes a health care practitioner to prescribe epinephrine auto-injectors in the name of an authorized entity notwithstanding any other provision of law. Permits pharmacists and health practitioners to dispense epinephrine auto-injectors pursuant to a prescription.

Permits authorized entities to have a stock of epinephrine auto-injectors.

Requires that an employee, agent or other individual associated with the authorized entity, that has completed the requisite training, may administer the auto-injector. Stipulates that the training include:

(i) how to recognize the signs of anaphylaxis;

(ii) standards and procedures for the safe storage and administration of the auto-injector and

(iii) emergency follow-up procedures.

Defines "authorized entity' to mean any entity or organization, other than a school described in Section 59-63-95, in connection with or at which allergens capable of causing anaphylaxis may be present including, but not limited to, recreation camps, colleges and universities, day care facilities, places of worship, youth sports leagues, amusement parks, restaurants, places of employment, and sports arenas.

Defines 'administer' to mean the direct application of an epinephrine auto-injector to the body of an individual.

Current version (3/8/2016): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/3706_20160309.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/3706_20150224.htm

Bill: 2016 H.B. 4773, introduced by Representative Gregory Duckworth (R) on Good Samaritan Laws. Status: Final Enacted  Final version (5/31/2016): Stipulates at the request of the patient for whom a do not resuscitate order is written or his surrogate or agent, the health care provider who executes the do not resuscitate order shall make the order in writing on a form and either shall:

(i) affix to the wrist of the patient a do not resuscitate bracelet that meets the specifications established or

(ii) provide the patient or his surrogate or agent with an order form, from a commercial vendor to allow the patient to order a do not resuscitate bracelet from the commercial vendor.

Defines a "Do not resuscitate bracelet" or 'bracelet' to mean a standardized identification bracelet that:

(i) meets the specifications established under Section 44-78-30(B)(1) or that is approved by the department

(ii) bears the inscription 'Do Not Resuscitate and

(iii) signifies that the wearer is a patient who has obtained a do not resuscitate order which has not been revoked.

Removed a provision stating that the vendor approved by the Department shall not fulfill a request for a do not resuscitate bracelet without receiving a health care provider's order for the bracelet with the request.

Final version (5/31/2016): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/4773_20160531.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/4773_20160413.htm

Bill: 2016 H.B. 4999, introduced by Representative Stephen Goldfinch (R) on Good Samaritan Laws,Medical Malpractice. Status: Final Enacted  Final version (4/2/2016): Stipulates that if a health care provider, licensed pursuant to the law of this State, informs his or her patient in writing, which may include use of an electronic medical record device, before treatment that the treatment to be rendered by the health care provider will be provided free of charge, the services rendered are deemed to be within the scope of the Good Samaritan statute.

States that any licensed health care provider who renders medical services voluntarily and without compensation or the expectation or promise of compensation and seeks no reimbursement from charitable and governmental sources may fulfill one hour of continuing education for each hour of volunteer medical services rendered, up to a maximum of twenty-five percent of the provider's required continuing education credits for the licensure period.

Final version (4/28/2016): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/4999_20160428.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/4999_20160225.htm

Bill: 2016 H.B. 5193, introduced by Representative Chip Huggins (R) on Good Samaritan Laws. Status: Final Enacted  Final version (5/31/2016): Permits a pharmacist acting in good faith and exercising reasonable care to dispense an opioid antidote pursuant to a written joint protocol issued by the Board of Medical Examiners and the Board of Pharmacy.

Stipulates within six months from the passage of this measure, the Board of Medical Examiners and the Board of Pharmacy must issue a written joint protocol authorizing a pharmacist to dispense an opioid antidote without a patient-specific written order or prescription to a person at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose or to a caregiver of such a person.

Specifies that the protocol must include the following:

(i) Information that the pharmacist must provide to a person or caregiver at risk;

(ii) Documentation that a pharmacist must maintain records regarding the dispensing of the opioid antidote and confirmation that the information was provided to the at risk person or caregiver;

(iii) Notification of the person's designated physician or primary care provider than an opioid antidote has been dispensed to that person;

(iv) Any education or training requirements that the Board of Medical Examiners and the Board of Pharmacy deems necessary pursuant to the joint protocol;

(v) Guidelines for determining whether an individual is in a position to assist another in the event of an overdose;

(vi) Any other provisions deemed necessary by Board of Medical Examiners and the Board of Pharmacy.

Prohibits a pharmacist from delegating the dispensing of an opioid antidote to a pharmacy intern or pharmacy technician.

Requires that all records be maintained in the pharmacy for a period of at least 10 years from the date the opioid antidote was last dispensed.

Permits the Board of Medical Examiners and the Board of Pharmacy to create an advisory committee to assist in the development of the joint protocol.

Stipulates that the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is directed to study: (1) the possibility that a person experiencing an opioid-related overdose would be decreased if access to cannabis was legally permitted; and (2) the extent to which states have latitude by federal law for a Veterans Affairs' physician licensed in the State of South Carolina to provide a written certification that a veteran would benefit from the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes rather than being prescribed opioids.

Requires DHEC to provide the General Assembly a report on the findings by January 1, 2017.

Final version (5/31/2016): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/5193_20160531.htm

Amended version (4/28/2016): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/5193_20160428.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/5193_20160412.htm

Bill: 2016 S.B. 1037, introduced by Senator Thomas Alexander (R) on Scope of Practice (Sports Medicine). Status: Final Enacted  Exempts physicians visiting other states for a specific sporting event from certain licensing requirement to allow them to practice in a team training camp.

http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/1037_20160525.htm

Bill: 2015 H.B. 3083, introduced by Representative Chip Huggins (R) on Good Samaritan Laws. Status: Final Enacted  Final version (4/28/2015): Declares that a health care professional or pharmacist who, acting in good faith, directly or through a standing order, prescribes or dispenses an opioid antidote to a patient capable, in the judgment of the health care professional or pharmacist, of administering the opioid antidote in an emergency, is not, as a result of an act or omission, subject to criminal or civil liability, or professional disciplinary action for prescribing or dispensing an opioid antidote.

Mandates that a health care professional prescribing or dispensing an opioid antidote to a patient must ensure that the patient receives patient overdoses information. Specifies that a minimum the information must address: opioid overdose prevention and recognition, performance of rescue breathing and resuscitation, opioid antidote dosage and administration, the importance of calling 911 emergency telephone service for assistance with an opioid overdose, and care for an overdose, and care for an overdose victim after administration of the opioid antidote.

Requires a health care professional must document the provision of patient overdose information in the patient's medical record, or through similar means as determined by a written agreement between the health care professional and an organization.

Final version (4/28/2015): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/3083_20150428.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess121_2015-2016/prever/3083_20141211.htm

Bill: 2013 S.B. 840, introduced by Senator Kevin Bryant (R) on Prescription monitoring Programs. Status: Final Enacted  Final version (2/26/2014): Defines 'Authorized delegate' as an individual who is approved as having access to the prescription monitoring program and who is directly supervised by an authorized practitioner or pharmacist. Stipulates that the data in the prescription monitoring program must be provided to the persons for the prior twelve months of the date of the request. Provides that data in the prescription monitoring program beyond the prior twelve months of the date of request for persons will require a court order. Provides that a dispenser will submit the information required pursuant to subsection (B)(1) in accordance with transmission methods and protocols provided in the 'ASAP Telecommunications Format for Controlled Substances, May 1995 Version', developed by the American Society for Automation in Pharmacy, and will report every 30 days, between the first and the fifteenth of the month following the month the prescription was dispensed.

Final version (2/26/2014): http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess120_2013-2014/bills/840.htm

Introduced version: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess120_2013-2014/bills/840.htm